Tag Archives: cabbage

Chicken Chowder Recipe, or Just Add Corn

Gentle Readers, sometimes things don’t go according to plan. This week, I had planned the simplest of beans and rice for Sunday dinner, but alas, I had a half-portion of dried black beans and no time to correct the misfortune. So I punted. Here’s the result.

Chicken Chowder: Simple Comfort Food

Chicken Chowder: Simple Comfort Food

Chicken Chowder Recipe, or Just Add Corn

There is no reason to call this chowder except for the corn. I decided that anything with corn in it could legitimately be called a chowder. I’ll leave you to piece through the logic there.

olive oil
1/2 sweet onion, diced
2 carrots, peeled and diced
1 stalk of celery, diced
salt and pepper to taste
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 or 3 handfuls of shredded cabbage
1/2 or more frozen corn kernels
2 cups of shredded chicken, shredded from a rotisserie chicken
1 to 2 cups cheating chicken stock
1 can white beans, rinsed

1. In a medium sized pot, heat a splash of olive oil over medium heat. Toss in the onion, carrots, celery, and seasonings. Saute for a few minutes until onion is softened, stirring on occasion.

2. Add the cabbage, corn, and chicken, and some of the stock. Heat until cabbage is cooked and the corn is heated through, 7 to 10 minutes. Add more stock as needed.

3. Add the white beans, mashing a few up to thicken the chowder, and heat for a few minutes more. Adjust seasonings, serve.

Chicken Chowder with Trader Joe's Brown Rice Medley

Chicken Chowder with Trader Joe's Brown Rice Medley

This was so simple, and so satisfying. Both of The Practical Cooks Junior ate it, though The Youngest preferred the “grains” served with it (Trader Joe’s Brown Rice Medley with Chicken Stock). And I’ve got stock and chicken leftover for my chicken pie, score!

Do you feel that corn turns soup into chowder? Post a comment today! It’s so very painless, I promise.

Got questions, requests, or a bunch of leafy greens? Email them to practical cook at gmail dot com. Connect on Facebook: The Practical Cook Blog. (Thanks in advance for spreading The Practical Cook Blog word. Press “like” on Facebook today!)

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Where did this week go? It’s time for Sunday’s Weekly Menus!

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Homemade Chicken Soup Recipe, or Thanks, Mom

Gentle Readers, as I type this, my mom is in my kitchen cooking while we recuperate from lingering germs. This post is dedicated to her, for this Homemade Chicken Soup Recipe is hers, though I feel certain I’ve taken a few liberties. I am, after all, her daughter. There are as many chicken soup recipes as there are moms, but like many of you, I’m pretty sure mine is the best. Thanks, Mom.

The Practical Cook's Mom's Homemade Chicken Soup

The Practical Cook's Mom's Homemade Chicken Soup

Homemade Chicken Soup Recipe

I made this yesterday by purchasing a rotisserie chicken, boning it, making stock, and using some of the meat in the soup. Enjoy.

splash of olive oil
1/2 onion, diced
2 carrots, peeled and sliced
1/4 cabbage, rinsed, dried, and sliced into strips
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
6 to 8 cups chicken stock, preferably homemade (try Easy Chicken Stock)
1 cup cooked, shredded chicken (rotisserie chickens are great for this)
2 cups egg noodles (dry)
salt and black pepper to taste

1. In a medium soup pot, heat the olive oil over a gentle medium heat. When oil is hot but not smoking, add onion, carrots, and cabbage, stir. Season with thyme and a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Cook until veggies soften, a few minutes.

The Practical Cook's Mom's Ingrediente Segreto: Cabbage

The Practical Cook's Mom's Ingrediente Segreto: Cabbage

2. When veggies are to your preferred softness (don’t go too far, they’ll cook more), add the stock and bring to a boil over high heat. When the stock is boiling, add the chicken and egg noodles. Reduce the heat to medium-low, making sure the stock is still simmering, and cook the egg noodles for 7 or 8 minutes, until they are done.

Sautee the veggies until they're a bit soft.

Sautee the veggies until they're a bit soft.

3. Taste the soup, season with salt and pepper as needed. Serve in a special bowl, and kiss each recipient on the head when you hand them a spoon.

Chicken soup = Love

Chicken soup = Love

Do you make chicken soup when someone’s sick? Share your thoughts (or your mom’s recipe) by posting a comment below!

Send your tea and sympathy to practical cook at gmail dot com. Connect on Facebook: The Practical Cook Blog. (Thanks in advance for spreading The Practical Cook Blog word. Press “like” on Facebook today!)

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Up next, Surviving the Salad Bar.

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Reviews from the Road: Sgt. White’s Diner (with video!)

Gentle Readers, though I’m currently on location in Las Vegas, I’ve been talking about barbecue today. Why? Because you can take the Practical Cook out of the South, but . . . I think you know the rest. Sgt. White’s Diner is a little hole-in-the-wall place that shares a parking lot with the Piggly Wiggly in Beaufort, SC. If that’s not enough of a recommendation, read, or rather watch, on.

And for those who want to see a still shot of the delicious.

Steam Table of Porky Veggies

Steam Table of Porky Veggies

Cabbage Done Right!

Cabbage Done Right!

Please complete this sentence, Gentle Readers: When I see a small and unobtrusive restaurant, I . . .

I look forward to your comments.

Send your BBQ photos to practical cook at gmail dot com. Connect on Facebook: The Practical Cook Blog. (Thanks in advance for spreading the Practical Cook Blog word. Press “like” on Facebook today!)

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Live from Las Vegas, Road Food Update, No Shrimp Cocktails Allowed.

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Can this cabbage be saved?

Gentle readers, perhaps you’re thinking, why does the Practical Cook keep teasing us with the “Can this supper be saved?” series? Supper is always saved. Wrong. Open the kitchen confessional (which I must assume is actually the pantry door, possibly the fridge for an extra-juicy confession),this one ends badly, and not just because it involves cabbage, haters.

Pointy-Headed Cabbage in the Spin Cycle

Pointy-Headed Cabbage in the Spin Cycle

For Sunday supper, a green vegetable is required. This is a rule, bordering on a sacred one. In fact, for all meals, a green vegetable is required. Just ask my brother, he can cite this chapter and verse. We like cabbage here at Team Practical Cook, and this was a pointy-headed cabbage from our CSA, an exceptional varietal.

Cabbage Before Things Went Terribly Wrong

Cabbage Before Things Went Terribly Wrong

The Practical Cook values simplicity, so she does a quick pan-braise: clean chopped cabbage, slightly sweet liquid, dash of Dijon mustard, cumin seeds (she doesn’t care for caraway, but feel free). Apple juice is nice here, but due to a shortage in the home, blackberry juice was subbed. Interesting, not bad.

Ajwain Seeds

Ajwain Seeds

The problem came at the seeds. In a rush, I grabbed Ajwain seeds instead of whole cumin, tossing them in before I realized. I added a few cumin seeds on top, but the damage was done. Survey says—stank cabbage. As wikipedia notes, even a few Ajwain seeds will permeate the dish. Yeah, I didn’t use a few. We ate it, but did not enjoy it. It made me think of cafeteria cabbage, and I do not mean that as a compliment.

Sunday Dinner with the Practical Cook

Sunday Dinner with the Practical Cook

Lesson: Look before you leap. Don’t panic if you fail. Life will bring you another cabbage. And line up your seasonings before you need them. There you have it, The Practical Cook could not save this cabbage.

The hotlines are open, share your cooking calamities here, or privately (where I’ll share then in aggregate later, in an expose).

Send your kitchen confessionals and requests for anonymity to practical cook at gmail dot com. Connect on Facebook: The Practical Cook Blog. (Thanks in advance for spreading the Practical Cook Blog word. Press “like” on Facebook today!)

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For the love of tomatoes, tomorrow will be a guide to serving Sliced Tomatoes. Yes, there are rules.

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Punt! Rotisserie Chicken al Pastor

What could be better than a Rotisserie Chicken? Out at dinner with some fellow bloggers (or as the Practical Cook prefers to say, “real bloggers”—these ladies know what they’re about), it was nice to discover that these convenient fowl have quite a following. Sunday night’s emergency chicken left enough chicken to do something with, but not enough to stretch for a meal for four. What to do?

Open-face Pollo Taco al Pastor

Open-face Pollo Taco al Pastor

Every once in a while, there’s a happy moment where multiple little things are in the fridge and they work together. This recipe comes from that special place, but is good enough that I’ll collect the ingredients and make it on purpose

Rotisserie Chicken al Pastor Recipe

Adjust amounts relative to your taste and your leftovers.

dash of olive oil
1 spring onion (or a scant 1/4 cup chopped onion, if you have one that needs to be used up)
1 head green garlic, minced (or a couple of cloves of regular garlic)
1 to 1 1/2 cups leftover rotisserie chicken, skin and bones removed, shredded
1 to 1 1/2 cups diced pineapple (fresh if you’ve got it, but a can will work fine), juice reserved
1/2 can diced tomatoes with mild chiles, or more to taste
1/8 teaspoon cumin
corn tortillas
1 cup shredded cabbage
lime wedges
guacamole, sour cream, chopped cilantro, diced onion, radish slices (optional accompaniments)

1. In a medium saucepan, heat olive oil over medium heat until shimmering but not smoking. Add onion and garlic and stir until you smell them. Immediately add chicken and pineapple.

2. Stir mixture and cook for a few minutes until pineapple begins to get juicy. Add tomatoes and cumin, and add some of the pineapple juice, or extra tomato juice if the mixture is dry. Stir to combine, cover with a lid, and reduce the heat to low.

3. Simmer the mixture for 15 or 20 minutes until flavors meld, adjusting seasonings as needed.

4. When the chicken mixture tastes good, serve it on corn tortillas with a bit of shredded cabbage and a squeeze of lime juice.

Rotisserie Chicken al Pastor with Mexican Corn and Beans

Rotisserie Chicken al Pastor with Mexican Corn and Beans

Stand back taco truck owners, pollo al pastor in the house! (For those who aren’t taco truck fans, tacos al pastor are made with pork, take much longer to make than the above cheater recipe, and really rock out. So do give them a try.)

Do you prefer soft or hard tacos? Vote today in the comments section!

Send questions and thoughts to practical cook at gmail dot com. Connect on Facebook: The Practical Cook Blog. (Like, like, like! Press “like” on Facebook today!)

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Up next, Can This Castle Cake be saved? Birthday disaster looms.

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Extremely Practical Slaw (or Punting! with Cabbage)

Well, hello June, where did you come from? Summertime means grilling. Grilling means burgers. Burgers mean slaw. Do what? Yes, if you’re Southern, you know about the Carolina-style hamburger: chili, slaw, mustard, and onions. Don’t knock it till you’ve tried it! And if you’re going to make slaw for this or any other purpose, I’ve got the recipe for you.

Goaty McBeet Burger with Slaw

Goaty McBeet Burger with Slaw

You see, slaw is a running joke in the Practical Cook’s family. It is one of the only things the Practical Cook’s Mom makes that TPC won’t eat. You heard me mom, I don’t care if you’ve gotten a new pepper grinder that doesn’t shoot whole peppercorns into it (more like I gifted my family with a new one), or banned celery seed from the kitchen. Let’s not even talk about that green plastic 1970s bowl. I love my mother, I love her cooking, I have my own slaw recipe, and here it is.

Extremely Practical Slaw Recipe

These are some guidelines, which you can further adapt to suit your own tastes. I’ve adapted this recipe from the very talented Anne Byrn, best known for her Cake Mix Doctor series, from What Can I Bring? (Full disclosure, I once worked for the publisher.) The simplicity of this recipe involves the food processor. Personally, I would attempt without it or a mandoline, or some such chopping device.

Off with your head, cabbage!

Off with your head, cabbage!

1/2 a large head of cabbage, or 1 small one, trimmed, cored, rinsed, and sliced small enough to shove into a food processor chute, courtesy of the family farm
2 carrots, washed and peeled
1/4 to 1/2 sweet onion (make sure it is a sweet, not just a white, yellow, or red)
scant 1/2 cup mayo
1/4 cup sweet pickle juice (as in the juice you drain from the sweet pickle jar), or rice or white wine vinegar if you don’t have pickle juice on hand
1/4 cup or more pickle relish
1 or 2 Tablespoons sugar (don’t overdo it, especially if you’re using  a lot of sweet pickle relish)
1 teaspoon seasoned salt, such as Lawry’s, or my fave, a mix of 3/4 teaspoon Lawry’s and 1/4 teaspoon Ms. Dash

1. Shred the cabbage on the 1/4 inch shredder disc on the food processor.

Cabbage Shredded!

Cabbage Shredded!

2. Change the food processor disc to the smallest grater. Process the carrots and onion.

Carrot and Onion in the Chopper

Carrot and Onion in the Chopper

3. Put all shredded items into a large bowl, creating a well (hole) in the middle. Add the seasonings. Stir. Taste. Adjust seasonings as needed. Chill to meld flavors. Eat!

Serving suggestions: on a burger, beside a burger, on a hot dog, beside a hot dog. On a rueben. Slaw is very versatile, don’t fear the cabbage! And the Goaty McBeet Burger recipe will be coming soon.

Practical Carolina-Style Burger with Slaw

Practical Carolina-Style Burger with Slaw

Do you have a family recipe reject? Share your stories here in the comments section, or Tweet away!

Send your recipes and suggestions to practical cook at gmail dot com. Connect on Facebook: The Practical Cook Blog. (Like, like, like! Press “like” on Facebook today! Thank to everyone for helping to earn our very own name: facebook.com/practicalcook)

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Coming up next, Kitchen Tool Talk!

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