Three Reasons to Host a Potluck

Gentle Readers, today’s post is inspired by a chance conversation The Practical Cook had across the pond, in merry old London, reinforced by a recent jaunt to Colonial Williamsburg. You see, apparently when we revolted, we also embraced the concept of the potluck (I think it’s covered under the right to gather unencumbered, especially involving cream of mushroom).

Let us fight for our right to congregate around stews and casseroles!

Let us fight for our right to congregate around stews and casseroles!

When you have “people round for dinner,” it is apparently unheard of to ask anyone to bring anything. But if you distribute the labor, you can hold them more often, I argued. My English companions were not impressed.

A spot of tea, anyone?

A spot of tea, anyone?

Perhaps the original potluck, the Boston Tea Party, still grates.

Three Reasons to Host a Potluck

Having recently attended a potluck hosted by The Eldest Practical Cook Junior’s class, I can say with authority that even the youth of today can join in and enjoy the experience. A huge shout-out to everyone involved in the planning, it was fantastic.

1. Community. I’ve said it before, I’ll say it again, sitting down with people to eat builds community. We don’t do enough of it these days.

Pass the carbs, join with your neighbors.

Pass the carbs, join with your neighbors.

2. Opportunity. It is a chance to share, to teach, and to learn. The 1st graders provided dessert, each class producing one. The Eldest was a “whipped creamer” for the pudding sundae. Check out the presentation, the written instruction, and the class project, all great learning opportunities. And for someone like me, the chance to taste everyone’s food is not to be passed up.

Potlucks can teach us something, too: manners, cooperation, new recipes, and even how-to.

Potlucks can teach us something, too: manners, cooperation, new recipes, and even how-to.

3. Frequency. It’s easier and less daunting to provide the space if you don’t have to cook everything too. The Eldest is already checking our calendar to schedule a potluck of our own. The more you do such things, the more you get back. Give it a try. And if each person/group/family is assigned one course or category, it is all easily done.

Meet the Pudding Cup Sundaes, resplendent with whipped cream and crushed cookies!

Meet the Pudding Cup Sundaes, resplendent with whipped cream and crushed cookies!

Ideas, queries, lucrative offers? Email them to practical cook at gmail dot com. Connect on Facebook: The Practical Cook Blog. (Thanks in advance for spreading The Practical Cook Blog word. Press “like” on Facebook today!)

Follow practicalcook on Twitter

On Friday, we’ll update the Bacon Brackets!

About these ads

Leave a comment

Filed under Can this supper be saved?, Kitchen Philosophy

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s